Homicide and Violent Crime Investigations: Exploring the Roles of Physical Evidence & Offender Behavior in Solving Crime

$0.00

19 in stock

DATE: Wednesday, JUNE 5

TIME: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

19 in stock

Homicide and Violent Crime Investigations:
Exploring the Roles of Physical Evidence and Offender Behavior in Solving Crime (8 Hours)

Crime assessment is a method of criminal investigation that utilizes key structures within the criminological continuum to examine the presence and/or absence of evidence found at the crime scene. Within this framework, there are four major classifications, referred to as the sub-types hereafter, which will be introduced and explained. These sub-types span across the criminal spectrum and manifest in the expression of pathological behaviors that can be recognized. Predicated upon these primary factors and coupled with additional principles, understanding the crime scene and offender actions through the crime continuum provides a critical understanding for the motives, methods, and opportunities of the crime.

Although crime assessment was originally created to identify sub-types in sexual assault cases, and further developed to identify offenders in sexual and non-sexual homicides, we have found that crime assessment applies to all criminal activity. An offender’s sub-type crime pattern can be identified in all crimes.

Crime assessment measures the crime by known major sub-type crime patterns (Power-Assertive type; Power-Reassurance type; Anger Retaliatory type; and Anger -Excitation type). These sub-types provide a structural foundation from which to analyze crimes, in effect becoming the DNA of crime. That is, criminal research has identified key elements of the crime which can shape the investigation and provide critical knowledge regarding the various elements of the crime, including, but certainly not limited to, providing recommended methods of apprehension, interviewing strategies and prosecutorial considerations.

The attendees will have the understanding that, although the human experience is variable, crime patterns can be coded to reveal interlocking and separate vectors. By doing so, recurrent elements and themes are developed to group common factors for various desires, intentions, and plans. Therefore, dependent upon the intended outcome, the crimes can reveal differentiated power and anger issues, levels of intimacy and necessary idiosyncrasies that must be avoided. Accordingly, whilst acting out crime, the criminal many times inadvertently leaves these crime and post-crime clues available for investigation.

The Crime Assessment Symposium provides new and veteran investigators, as well as all law enforcement partners, with a unique and practical approach to training.

Attendees receive demonstrations of how investigative techniques, evidence analysis and crime assessment help to characterize the offender based on the presence (and absence) of physical evidence. The attendee will learn behavior based controlled conversation (Interviewing & Interrogation) methods which utilizes the characteristics identified through the evidence analysis and crime assessment. The course also introduces attendees to investigative techniques to use while investigating Equivocal Deaths and Staged Crime Scenes.

The course utilizes case studies to better understand these techniques. This hands-on approach helps investigators to leave with the knowledge and tactics required to solve challenging cases more effectively. The course was developed with Richard D. Walter, utilizing the research that was conducted by Richard D. Walter, forensic psychologist, and Robert D. Keppel, retired Chief Criminal Investigator for the Washington State Attorney General’s Office. This training has been provided to law enforcement and law enforcement partners, as well as professional societies, including the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. This course was developed to be adaptable to fit into any schedule from one to three days.

Course Objectives:
Upon completing this course, the attendee:
Can cite the difference between Crime Assessment, an evidence-based process, verses Criminal Profiling, a psychological based process.
Will recall the three phases of a crime/death, and how to apply this information to provide a positive investigative outcome.
Will utilize the learned skill set to properly apply risk assessment to an investigation and collect the information to decide level of victim risk and offender risk.
Can assess the paralogical reasoning system and identify the level of victim and offender emotion.
Can recognize the difference between a crime driven by fantasy and one that contains no fantasy issues.
Can judge a criminal act and conclude whether the crime scene and offender are organized, disorganized, or both.
Can compare the dynamics of a crime scene, homicidal pattern, and offender behavior characteristics, and select the proper sub-type and crime motivation.
Will have the ability to identify the proper sub-type and crime motivation to choose the proper behavioral controlled conversation technique to use when interviewing any individual involved at a crime scene.
Will differentiate between the causes and manners of death and recognize the characteristics for each.
Can cite the definition of a staged crime scene, and when a crime scene is identified as staged, they can apply the proper investigative techniques.

Instructor: Patrick Zirpoli
Patrick began his career 34 years ago within the law enforcement industry as a Correctional Officer with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, he ultimately joined the Pennsylvania State Police, from which he retired in January of 2015. Throughout his career with the state police, he worked primarily in the area of criminal investigation specializing in homicide investigation, cold case homicide investigation, child abduction, child abuse and missing persons. Patrick’s last duty assignment was as the Unit Supervisor of the Pennsylvania State Police, Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit. He was responsible for the coordination of a statewide Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit, which specialized in crimes of a violent or serial nature. Patrick also coordinated the efforts of the State Police in cold case homicide investigations across Pennsylvania. He supervised and participated in the investigation and analysis of crime assessments relating to homicides, suspicious deaths, and equivocal deaths on a statewide basis. Furthermore, he served as the Pennsylvania Amber Alert and the Missing Endangered Persons Advisory System Coordinator. During his tenure as the Amber Alert Coordinator, he worked on numerous child abduction cases throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Patrick represented the Pennsylvania State Police as a subject matter expert in the fields of Crime Scene Assessment, Criminal Behavior, Homicide Investigation, Equivocal Death Analysis, Cold Case Homicide Investigation, Child Abduction, Child Abuse, Interview and Interrogation, Sexual Assault Investigation, and the Prison Rape Elimination Act, and have since taken his experience and expertise into the classroom as both a teacher and a coordinator.

Along with his experience in the field, he served as the Training Coordinator for the Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit. Patrick has had the opportunity to create multiple courses in various subjects, including Crime Assessment, Homicide Investigation, Equivocal Death Analysis, Cold Case Homicide Investigation, Child Death Investigation, Sexual Assault Investigation, Amber Alert/Child Abduction, Missing and Endangered Persons Investigations, and the Prison Rape Elimination Act. These courses have been taught to law enforcement agencies and related groups throughout the United States and internationally. He has been a guest lecturer for the FBI at the Violent Crime Seminar, as well as a lecturer at numerous professional conferences, to include the American Academy of Forensic Science Conference.

Patrick has also provided expert testimony in his areas of expertise. Most recently he was recognized by the Indiana Supreme Court as an expert in Crime Scene Reconstruction, Crime Scene Assessment and Unsolved Homicide Investigation.

Patrick is currently the Sr. Investigative Consultant for the Sherry Black Foundation, a non-profit foundation based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The foundation offers 3 program areas, the first is Symposiums. We provide affordable 3-day training of advanced investigative knowledge to local agencies that lead these investigations. Second, case consultation, we have a network of experts that use their expertise and skills to review and consult on investigations. Finally, we provide resources and funding for investigators to access tools, such as testing, expert testimony, exhumations, and IGG.

Product Description

Homicide and Violent Crime Investigations:
Exploring the Roles of Physical Evidence and Offender Behavior in Solving Crime (8 Hours)

Crime assessment is a method of criminal investigation that utilizes key structures within the criminological continuum to examine the presence and/or absence of evidence found at the crime scene. Within this framework, there are four major classifications, referred to as the sub-types hereafter, which will be introduced and explained. These sub-types span across the criminal spectrum and manifest in the expression of pathological behaviors that can be recognized. Predicated upon these primary factors and coupled with additional principles, understanding the crime scene and offender actions through the crime continuum provides a critical understanding for the motives, methods, and opportunities of the crime.

Although crime assessment was originally created to identify sub-types in sexual assault cases, and further developed to identify offenders in sexual and non-sexual homicides, we have found that crime assessment applies to all criminal activity. An offender’s sub-type crime pattern can be identified in all crimes.

Crime assessment measures the crime by known major sub-type crime patterns (Power-Assertive type; Power-Reassurance type; Anger Retaliatory type; and Anger -Excitation type). These sub-types provide a structural foundation from which to analyze crimes, in effect becoming the DNA of crime. That is, criminal research has identified key elements of the crime which can shape the investigation and provide critical knowledge regarding the various elements of the crime, including, but certainly not limited to, providing recommended methods of apprehension, interviewing strategies and prosecutorial considerations.

The attendees will have the understanding that, although the human experience is variable, crime patterns can be coded to reveal interlocking and separate vectors. By doing so, recurrent elements and themes are developed to group common factors for various desires, intentions, and plans. Therefore, dependent upon the intended outcome, the crimes can reveal differentiated power and anger issues, levels of intimacy and necessary idiosyncrasies that must be avoided. Accordingly, whilst acting out crime, the criminal many times inadvertently leaves these crime and post-crime clues available for investigation.

The Crime Assessment Symposium provides new and veteran investigators, as well as all law enforcement partners, with a unique and practical approach to training.

Attendees receive demonstrations of how investigative techniques, evidence analysis and crime assessment help to characterize the offender based on the presence (and absence) of physical evidence. The attendee will learn behavior based controlled conversation (Interviewing & Interrogation) methods which utilizes the characteristics identified through the evidence analysis and crime assessment. The course also introduces attendees to investigative techniques to use while investigating Equivocal Deaths and Staged Crime Scenes.

The course utilizes case studies to better understand these techniques. This hands-on approach helps investigators to leave with the knowledge and tactics required to solve challenging cases more effectively. The course was developed with Richard D. Walter, utilizing the research that was conducted by Richard D. Walter, forensic psychologist, and Robert D. Keppel, retired Chief Criminal Investigator for the Washington State Attorney General’s Office. This training has been provided to law enforcement and law enforcement partners, as well as professional societies, including the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. This course was developed to be adaptable to fit into any schedule from one to three days.

Course Objectives:
Upon completing this course, the attendee:
Can cite the difference between Crime Assessment, an evidence-based process, verses Criminal Profiling, a psychological based process.
Will recall the three phases of a crime/death, and how to apply this information to provide a positive investigative outcome.
Will utilize the learned skill set to properly apply risk assessment to an investigation and collect the information to decide level of victim risk and offender risk.
Can assess the paralogical reasoning system and identify the level of victim and offender emotion.
Can recognize the difference between a crime driven by fantasy and one that contains no fantasy issues.
Can judge a criminal act and conclude whether the crime scene and offender are organized, disorganized, or both.
Can compare the dynamics of a crime scene, homicidal pattern, and offender behavior characteristics, and select the proper sub-type and crime motivation.
Will have the ability to identify the proper sub-type and crime motivation to choose the proper behavioral controlled conversation technique to use when interviewing any individual involved at a crime scene.
Will differentiate between the causes and manners of death and recognize the characteristics for each.
Can cite the definition of a staged crime scene, and when a crime scene is identified as staged, they can apply the proper investigative techniques.

Instructor: Patrick Zirpoli
Patrick began his career 34 years ago within the law enforcement industry as a Correctional Officer with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, he ultimately joined the Pennsylvania State Police, from which he retired in January of 2015. Throughout his career with the state police, he worked primarily in the area of criminal investigation specializing in homicide investigation, cold case homicide investigation, child abduction, child abuse and missing persons. Patrick’s last duty assignment was as the Unit Supervisor of the Pennsylvania State Police, Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit. He was responsible for the coordination of a statewide Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit, which specialized in crimes of a violent or serial nature. Patrick also coordinated the efforts of the State Police in cold case homicide investigations across Pennsylvania. He supervised and participated in the investigation and analysis of crime assessments relating to homicides, suspicious deaths, and equivocal deaths on a statewide basis. Furthermore, he served as the Pennsylvania Amber Alert and the Missing Endangered Persons Advisory System Coordinator. During his tenure as the Amber Alert Coordinator, he worked on numerous child abduction cases throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Patrick represented the Pennsylvania State Police as a subject matter expert in the fields of Crime Scene Assessment, Criminal Behavior, Homicide Investigation, Equivocal Death Analysis, Cold Case Homicide Investigation, Child Abduction, Child Abuse, Interview and Interrogation, Sexual Assault Investigation, and the Prison Rape Elimination Act, and have since taken his experience and expertise into the classroom as both a teacher and a coordinator.

Along with his experience in the field, he served as the Training Coordinator for the Criminal Investigation Assessment Unit. Patrick has had the opportunity to create multiple courses in various subjects, including Crime Assessment, Homicide Investigation, Equivocal Death Analysis, Cold Case Homicide Investigation, Child Death Investigation, Sexual Assault Investigation, Amber Alert/Child Abduction, Missing and Endangered Persons Investigations, and the Prison Rape Elimination Act. These courses have been taught to law enforcement agencies and related groups throughout the United States and internationally. He has been a guest lecturer for the FBI at the Violent Crime Seminar, as well as a lecturer at numerous professional conferences, to include the American Academy of Forensic Science Conference.

Patrick has also provided expert testimony in his areas of expertise. Most recently he was recognized by the Indiana Supreme Court as an expert in Crime Scene Reconstruction, Crime Scene Assessment and Unsolved Homicide Investigation.

Patrick is currently the Sr. Investigative Consultant for the Sherry Black Foundation, a non-profit foundation based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The foundation offers 3 program areas, the first is Symposiums. We provide affordable 3-day training of advanced investigative knowledge to local agencies that lead these investigations. Second, case consultation, we have a network of experts that use their expertise and skills to review and consult on investigations. Finally, we provide resources and funding for investigators to access tools, such as testing, expert testimony, exhumations, and IGG.

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