The Use of Forensic Entomology in Criminal Investigations

$0.00

17 in stock

DATE: Thursday, June 6

TIME: 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

17 in stock

The Use of Forensic Entomology in Criminal Investigations (3.5 hours)
Forensic entomology, the application of insect science to legal investigations, has emerged as a pivotal tool in unraveling the mysteries of time and circumstance surrounding death. This lecture delves into the intricate world of forensic entomology, shedding light on its methodologies, significance, and evolving role in modern criminal investigations.

This presentation will begin with an overview of the life cycles of various insects, particularly those that play a crucial role in forensic scenarios. We will explore the distinct stages of decomposition and how entomological evidence can be harnessed to estimate postmortem intervals with frequent precision. A significant portion of the lecture will be dedicated to case studies where forensic entomology has played a pivotal role in solving crimes. From determining the location of death to identifying the presence of drugs or toxins through insect analysis, these cases underscore the versatility of entomological evidence in forensic investigations.

The lecture will also touch upon the challenges faced by forensic entomologists, including factors influencing insect behavior, environmental variables, and the need for standardized protocols. Furthermore, the ethical considerations surrounding the use of insect evidence in legal settings will be examined, emphasizing the responsibility of forensic entomologists to communicate findings clearly and objectively in court.
In conclusion, this lecture aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of forensic entomology’s role as a valuable forensic science tool. By delving into its intricacies, real-world applications, and ongoing advancements, participants will gain insights into the evolving landscape of forensic investigations and the critical role insects play in solving crimes.

Students should bring whatever notetaking medium they desire (pen/paper, laptop, etc.)

Instructor:
Douglas A. Young began his career in law enforcement and training as a crime scene investigator in 1993 with the Gibson County Sheriff’s Office in Southwestern Indiana. Since then Doug has accumulated over 30 years of experience as a crime scene investigator and forensic analyst. Enjoying the teaching and training aspect of crime scene investigation, Doug began sharing his knowledge and experiences with colleagues by presenting training classes and workshops on various forensic topics, both domestically and internationally. In 2004, Doug realized that many agencies he worked with did not have the resources to conduct a thorough forensic review of their cases. It was for this reason that Doug founded Triad Forensics LLC. Through Triad Forensics, Doug has been able to provide training, case review and actual crime scene response services to a number of agencies.

In 2012, Doug founded the Colorado Forensic Investigators Group (COFIG), which was a small group of forensic investigators from the Denver Metro area that came together to train and provide support for fellow forensic investigators. This group includes investigators from Federal, State, County and Municipal levels of government. Over the years, COFIG has grown to 230 members, which includes members from the State of Wyoming and the United States Military.

In 2020, Doug authored as article Crime Scene Reconstruction: Beginning the Process that was published in Evidence Technology Magazine as well as the official publication of the South Carolina Division of the International Association for Identification; The Identifier.

Product Description

The Use of Forensic Entomology in Criminal Investigations (3.5 hours)
Forensic entomology, the application of insect science to legal investigations, has emerged as a pivotal tool in unraveling the mysteries of time and circumstance surrounding death. This lecture delves into the intricate world of forensic entomology, shedding light on its methodologies, significance, and evolving role in modern criminal investigations.

This presentation will begin with an overview of the life cycles of various insects, particularly those that play a crucial role in forensic scenarios. We will explore the distinct stages of decomposition and how entomological evidence can be harnessed to estimate postmortem intervals with frequent precision. A significant portion of the lecture will be dedicated to case studies where forensic entomology has played a pivotal role in solving crimes. From determining the location of death to identifying the presence of drugs or toxins through insect analysis, these cases underscore the versatility of entomological evidence in forensic investigations.

The lecture will also touch upon the challenges faced by forensic entomologists, including factors influencing insect behavior, environmental variables, and the need for standardized protocols. Furthermore, the ethical considerations surrounding the use of insect evidence in legal settings will be examined, emphasizing the responsibility of forensic entomologists to communicate findings clearly and objectively in court.
In conclusion, this lecture aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of forensic entomology’s role as a valuable forensic science tool. By delving into its intricacies, real-world applications, and ongoing advancements, participants will gain insights into the evolving landscape of forensic investigations and the critical role insects play in solving crimes.

Students should bring whatever notetaking medium they desire (pen/paper, laptop, etc.)

Instructor:
Douglas A. Young began his career in law enforcement and training as a crime scene investigator in 1993 with the Gibson County Sheriff’s Office in Southwestern Indiana. Since then Doug has accumulated over 30 years of experience as a crime scene investigator and forensic analyst. Enjoying the teaching and training aspect of crime scene investigation, Doug began sharing his knowledge and experiences with colleagues by presenting training classes and workshops on various forensic topics, both domestically and internationally. In 2004, Doug realized that many agencies he worked with did not have the resources to conduct a thorough forensic review of their cases. It was for this reason that Doug founded Triad Forensics LLC. Through Triad Forensics, Doug has been able to provide training, case review and actual crime scene response services to a number of agencies.

In 2012, Doug founded the Colorado Forensic Investigators Group (COFIG), which was a small group of forensic investigators from the Denver Metro area that came together to train and provide support for fellow forensic investigators. This group includes investigators from Federal, State, County and Municipal levels of government. Over the years, COFIG has grown to 230 members, which includes members from the State of Wyoming and the United States Military.

In 2020, Doug authored as article Crime Scene Reconstruction: Beginning the Process that was published in Evidence Technology Magazine as well as the official publication of the South Carolina Division of the International Association for Identification; The Identifier.

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